During a divorce, spousal support is not a standard, guaranteed privilege to a party. They must meet one of the following categories:

1.The paying spouse was convicted of family violence within two years of the date of divorce.

2. The marriage was 10 years or longer and the requesting spouse lacks sufficient property to provide for his/her minimal needs and is unable to support himself/herself through appropriate employment because of an incapacitating disability.

3. The marriage was 10 years or longer and the requesting spouse lacks sufficient property to provide for minimal needs and is the custodian of a child who requires substantial care and personal supervision, making it necessary for that spouse to remain at home with that child.

4. The marriage was 10 years or longer and the requesting spouse lacks sufficient property to provide for minimal needs and the requesting spouse lacks earning ability in the job market sufficient to provide support for minimal needs.

However, spousal support is not guaranteed. In Texas, the bar is quite high for those requesting spousal support, as most courts are reluctant to grant it. Therefore, spousal maintenance is one of the more difficult forms of relief to achieve during a divorce. If a person clearly falls into one of the aforementioned categories, it should be granted, though.